“I am just so grateful to be able to visit Sexton High School and offer this amazing experience to kids that may never be able to learn about budgets until itâs too late! As a graduate of the Lansing Schools, I take pride in giving back in hopes that they will take what they learned to help each of them in the future!”— Cecilia, an MSUFCU employee
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Published: Jul 20, 2017

Teaching Young Girl Scouts the Importance of Responsible Money Management

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For the fourth year, MSUFCU has teamed up with Girl Scouts Heart of Michigan to hold annual badge-earning events in the area of financial education. These events bring financial education resources to the Girl Scouts and allow them to learn important money management skills while also working toward their collective Girl Scouts goals and mission.

 

For the 2016-2017 school year, MSUFCU hosted four events, allowing local Girl Scouts in the East Lansing and Sterling Heights areas to earn the Be Your Own Boss, Shopping Smarts, and Budgeting badges. In all four events, a total of 130 girls were present, ranging in age groups.

 

Our Financial Educators organized the events according to the badges:

 

Be Your Own Boss

Girls learned about entrepreneurs their own age and were encouraged to imagine a business that suits their interests while providing a worthwhile good to the community.

 

Budgeting

First, girls determined their values (family, independence, intelligence, exploration, etc.) by reflecting on times in their lives when they felt the most happy and satisfied. Then, they discussed how values affect spending habits and did some detective work on fictional credit card statements to determine the values of others. Finally, they reflected on goals for the future, determined what they’d like to save up for, and filled out a table to help determine how much they needed to save each week or month to reach said goals.

 

Smart Shopping

This event was a lock-in at Lakeside Mall with two different short, interactive activities. The first was a discussion surrounding wants vs. needs, in which the girls would sort pictures of items (a cell phone, boots, medicine, books) into two categories and then make difficult decisions based on scenarios. The second activity required girls to use their “visual literacy” skills to analyze magazine advertisements, honing in on what tactics companies use to coax you into buying.

 

Each year, the programs with Girl Scouts continue to grow. We are proud to support local girls in their quest for financial education literacy.